Job Satisfaction

Job satisfaction doesn’t just come from employing your skills well, you need to be applying your most enjoyable skills most of the time. Here’s how to identify them:

  • List the jobs or roles you liked the most over your entire work career;
  • Now list what you liked about each role;
  • Now list why you liked the role and/or what was the accomplishment that you enjoyed?

For example:  my favorite role was as an International Operations Director.  I was responsible for all non US IT Operations personnel.

  • What I liked the most: Travel, learning new cultures, team building and interactions with the people.
  • Why: I realized I enjoyed the coaching and mentoring, which is what was needed most in that particular role.
  • The accomplishment: I helped create a stronger, better operating team with greater communications and camaraderie throughout the IT organization.

That’s how I ended up leaving IT and moving into a Coaching career.  What I enjoyed most was working with people and helping them, not necessarily the IT side of bits and bytes.

What does this tell you?

Just because you’re not happy with what you’re doing where you are now doesn’t mean you ditch your current career; it does mean you need to figure out why and, maybe, do it differently.  For example, you’re an attorney working for a large firm and realize you haven’t been happy with what you’re doing for a while.  Maybe it’s where you’re working or you’re feeling lost in the crowd (not able to stand out) or the type of work is uninteresting or unfulfilling.  But if you could be a corporate legal council for a small business that produces something you’re interested in, that may make all the difference in the world.

So think about it.  What would keep you engaged and passionate?

If it’s the right career – wrong organization: What changes do you need to make to feel engaged within your job again?  Should you stay where you are or are the changes needed so great that you have to leave?

If it’s the wrong career: What skills do you have that are transferable to another occupation?  Do you need to go back to school?  How about certifications?  Can you move to another position within the current organization?

Lot’s of questions that only you can answer.  You may need help putting it all together or clearly identifying your strengths, likes, and dislikes.  A Career Coach can be that help, but the answers still come from you!

Change is scary, but being unhappy at work is way worse!

Making a decision one way or another about your career will take a weight off your shoulders you may not even realize you have.  Once you accept your decision and create a clear path forward you’ll be happier, more engaged, and ultimately more successful.

Check out our videos and workshops to see if we have anything to help you move forward into a role meant for you.

The dreaded job interview

The Dreaded Job Interview

Does going on an interview terrify you?  You have sweaty palms, your shirt is sticking to you so there is no way you could take your jacket off, and you just keep thinking “am I good enough, will they like me?”

How would it feel to be able to calmly shake the interviewer’s hand without wiping yours on your pants or skirt first?   How would it feel to be able to have a two-way conversation with the interviewer and hold your own, not feeling intimidated or unprepared?

Here is some practical advice to build your confidence in advance of the meeting so that you’re comfortable and feel like you are on an even playing field.

Let’s first remember that you must have done something right since you were called for an interview.  That means your resume hit the points listed in the job description and you are qualified.  Kudos to you! You’ve made it over the first hurdle.

Now it’s preparation time.  That means you research the company, get comfortable with why you applied in the first place.  You work on your story – the story that will sell yourself.  How do you stand out?  What makes you qualified for this job, over all other applicants?  You need to sell YOU.

And while you’re thinking about how to sell yourself, think about your communication skills.  Make sure you look people in the eyes while speaking.  If that isn’t a strong suit, role-play with your family or friends, you can even practice in front of a mirror.  Ensure you can effectively speak about your accomplishments that show how and where you would fit into the organization.  Again, if that makes you uncomfortable, practice, practice and more practice.  Be comfortable with yourself and the interviewer will be comfortable with you too.

Back to your research on the company, why should they hire you if you’re not interested in the organization? Businesses hire people to fill a need.  During the interview ask about the main issues the company would like to solve.  Remark on something you’ve read on their website, or an article that was posted about them. Show them you’ve invested some time and effort.

Lastly, remember you’re interviewing them too.  They need to sell you on working for them as much as you need to sell yourself.  And don’t ever forget that it’s just conversation. So, be the awesome, uniquely qualified individual they can’t do without.

One more thing, don’t forget to follow up.  After every interview, follow up with an influence letter. Here you will briefly thank the person you interviewed with, recap the conversation, explain what excites you about the role and share why you would be a good fit.

Now go rock that interview!